Glossary Of Consumer Finance Terms

A guide to many of the terms used in the consumer finance market. A Acceptance Rate – The percentage of customers that are successful when applying for a loan or credit card. 66% or more applicants must be offered the advertised rate know as the Typical APR (See ‘Typical APR’ below). Annual Percentage Rate (APR) … Continue reading “Glossary Of Consumer Finance Terms”

A guide to many of the terms used in the consumer finance market.


Acceptance Rate – The percentage of customers that are successful when applying for a loan or credit card. 66% or more applicants must be offered the advertised rate know as the Typical APR (See ‘Typical APR’ below).

Annual Percentage Rate (APR) – The rate of interest payable annually on the loan or credit card balance. This allows potential customers to compare lenders. Under the Consumer Credit Act Lenders are legally required to disclose their APR.

Arrears – Missed payments on a loan, credit card, mortgage or most kinds of debt are termed Arrears. The borrower has a legally binding obligation to settle any arrears as soon as possible.

Arrangement Fee – Generally for the administration costs of setting up a mortgage.


Base Rate – The interest rate set by the Bank of England. This is the rate charged to banks for lending from the Bank of England. The base rate and how it may change in the future has a direct influence on the interest rate a bank may charge the consumer on a loan or mortgage.

Business Loans – A loan specifically for a business and generally based on the businesses past and likely future performance.


Car Loan – A loan specifically for the purchase of a car.

Consumer Credit Association (CCA) – Represents most businesses in the consumer credit industry. Government, local authorities, financial bodies, finance focused media and consumer groups are all members. Members sign a constitution and must follow a code of practice and business conduct.

County Court Judgement (CCJ) – A CCJ can be issued by a County Court to an individual that has failed to settle outstanding debts. A CCJ will adversely affect the credit record of an individual and can possibly result in them being refused credit. A CCJ will stay on a credit record for 6 years. It is possible to avoid this major negative stain on your credit record by settling the CCJ in full within one month of receiving it, in this case no details of the CCJ will be stored on your credit record.

Credit Crunch – A situation where Lenders cut back on their lending simultaneously usually down to a shared fear that borrowers will not be able to repay their debts.

Credit File – Information stored by credit reference agencies, such as Experian, Equifax and CallCredit, on an individuals credit and borrowing arrangements. The Credit File is checked when Lenders consider a credit application.

Credit Reference Agencies – Companies that keep records of individuals credit and borrowing arrangements, amounts owed, with who and payments made, including any defaults, CCJ’s, arrears etc.

Credit Search – The general search undertaken by the Lender with the credit reference agencies.


Debt C0nsolidation – The transfer of multiple debts to a single debt via a loan or credit card.

Default – When a regular debt repayment is missed. A default will be recorded on an individuals credit record and will adversely affect the chance of success of any future credit applications.

Data Protection Act – An act of Parliament in 1998 and the main legislation that governs the use of personal data in the UK. Lenders are not allowed to share an individuals personal data directly with other institutions or companies.


Early Redemption Charge – A fee charged by Lenders if a borrower pays back their debt before the debts agreed term is reached.

Equity – The value a property has beyond any loan, mortgage or other debt held upon it. The amount of money an individual will receive if they sold their property and repaid the debt on the property in full.


Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) – The government appointed institution responsible for regulating the finance market.

First Charge – The mortgage on a property. A Lender who has first charge on a property will take priority for repayment of their mortgage or loan from the funds available after the sale of a property.

Fixed Rate – An interest rate that will not change.


Homeowner Loan – Also commonly known as a secured loan. A Homeowner Loan is only available to individuals that own their own home. The loan will be secured against the value of the property usually on the form of a second charge on the property.


Instalment Loans – Multiple loan repayments spread over a period. Depending on the Lender their may be flexibility in the repayment amounts and schedule.


Joint Application – A loan or other credit application made by a couple rather than a single person e.g. husband and wife.


Lender – The company providing the loan or mortgage.

Loan Purpose – The purpose for which the loan was acquired.

Loan Term – The period of time over which the loan will be repaid.

Loan To Value (LTV) – Generally associated with a mortgage and taking the form of a percentage. This is the loan amount in relation to the full value of the property. e.g. an individual may be offered a mortgage of 90% LTV on a property worth £100,000. In this case the offer would be £90,000.


Monthly Repayments – The monthly payments made to settle a loan including any interest.

Mortgage – A loan taken specifically to finance the purchase of a property in most cases a home. The property is offered as security to the Lender.


Online Loans – Although most loans are available online. The Internet has allowed for the development of technology that allows for the faster processing of a loan application than traditional methods. In some cases a loan application, agreement and the funds appearing in your account can take as little as 15 minutes or less.


Payday Loan – A short term cash advance of up to 31 days which is repayable on your next payday. Payday loans come with a high APR because of the shorter term of the loan.

Payment Protection Insurance (PPI) – Insurance to cover debt repayments should the borrower be unable to maintain their repayments for any number of reasons including redundancy, illness or an accident.

Personal Loans – A general loan for any purpose and in varying amounts that can be provided to an individual based up on their credit history.

Price For Risk – Lenders now have a range of interest rates that are chosen based on an individuals credit score. An individual with a poor credit score is deemed High Risk and will likely be offered a higher interest rate as the Lender factors in the possibility of them defaulting on their repayments. Conversely an individual with a high credit score and a good credit history is considered Low Risk and will be offered a lower rate of interest.


Qualifying Criteria – The eligibility requirements required by the Lender. The most basic criteria required to qualify for a loan in the UK are; permanent UK residency, age 18 or over and a regular income. Many Lenders may also include extra lending conditions.


Regulated – financial ‘products’ that are overseen by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA). Lenders must follow a code of conduct and individuals are protected by the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS).

Repayment Schedule – The time period over which a loan will be repaid and the details of the loan repayment amounts.


Second Charge – A second loan, in addition to any other loan, that is secured against an individuals property.

Secured Loan – Also commonly known as a Homeownr Loan. A secured loan is only available to to homeowners. The loan amount is secured against the value of the property. The Lender has the right to repossess your property should you fail to maintain the loan repayments.

Shared Ownership – An agreement in which an individual owns only a percentage of the property. The remaining percentage is owned by a third party often a housing association. The individual may have a mortgage on the part of the property they own and pay rent on the part of the property they do not own.


Total Amount Repayable – The total amount of the loan plus the interest and any applicable fees.

Typical APR – The advertised interest rate that is offered to a minimum of 66% of successful loan applicants.


Underwriting – The process of verifying data and approving a loan.

Unregulated – Not covered and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA).

Unsecured Loan – A loan that does not require collateral and is provided on ‘good faith’. Under the belief by the Lender that you can repay the loan based on your credit score, credit history and financial standing amongst other factors.


Variable Rate – An interest rate that will change during the loan repayment period.

The Inner Workings of Credit Repair

Credit problems can affect anyone at any given time. Whether bad credit scores arise from a layoff, wrongful termination, new or old medical conditions that cause large bills to pile up, divorce, improper money management, or other reasons raising a credit score can be a daunting task for even the most dedicated individuals. Not only can credit problems affect your loan interest rates but it can also prevent a person from landing a job that also bases a person’s character on their credit worthiness. When an individual finds himself or herself in this situation there are a couple potential solutions. One, to do the time-consuming research necessary to find the rules and regulations in order to fix your credit yourself, or two contact a reputable credit repair company that has already undergone the training and acquired the skills to negotiate through the credit lines and repair them.

What Repairs Do:

The process is started by reviewing your credit history on your credit reports. Once a thorough assessment has been made, we can determine the best course of action in your individual circumstance. Credit repair is not for everyone, and not all negative items can be removed from a credit report. Some items on a credit report may require settlements with an agreement that the specified item is modified to a positive line on the credit report while others take less drastic measures and require only the removal of the negative items. Contacting a credit repair company is the first step in beginning the repairing your credit.

How It Works:

There are legitimate negative errors on your credit report. A professional that repairs credit can contact the companies and have these errors fixed.

Errors on the credit report that cannot be verified. If any specific item in the credit report cannot be verified from, a company closing or being bought out our specialists can fix these errors by having the credit bureaus contact the lenders. Once they receive no response from the original creditor, the items must be removed.

Lenders willing to work with companies. The company contacts the individual companies and negotiates a settlement with them in order to create a positive remark on the individuals credit score. Not all companies are willing to negotiate with many companies, so this route does not always work.

Do I need to have my bad credit repaired?

You should ask this question before beginning the process of removal of derogatory marks from your credit.. While companies can help pretty much everyone with any type of credit repair it does cost money. If in your specific situation there are only one or two small problem lines which do not affect your credit score then companies are not of much use or if your payoff amounts for the negative lines are very small it may be easier and cheaper to just pay them off on your own. However, if you have a few or more lines with negative results or larger amounts owed which will require negotiation to lower the total cost to settle, it is in your best interest to contact a specialist today.

5 Things To Know Before You Review A Budget

Regardless of whether you opt to become a leader, or prefer to remain an involved, concerned and committed member of an organization, your ability and effectiveness will be positively enhanced, and your actual degree of personal responsibility, is often directly related to your willingness, ability and understanding of the essentials of organizational budgeting. While nearly every group mandates creating and approving an annual budget, very few do so in a way that actually makes the group more effective. Wouldn’t it make sense, therefore, if groups dedicated time and effort, to training their constituents, and especially their leadership (and most involved and concerned members), to all the essentials and necessitates of the various aspects of budgeting, and how to use it effectively? With that in mind, this article will briefly discuss five things you should know and understand, before you prepare, consider and review a budget.

1. What are the needs, priorities and goals for the organization? Budgets should never be created in a vacuum, but rather must be tools for evaluating needs and priorities, and allocating the best proportion of time, money and other resources, in the most efficacious manner. Since effective groups constantly evolve, this is a significant reason why the method most used for creating budgets (which, unfortunately, is generally merely taking the previous year’s document, and adding a certain percentage). Great budgets address how a group should operate and create plans and programs, etc.

2. Carefully evaluate both revenues and expenditures: Are you optimally and efficiently raising revenues, as well as spending as you should, rather than falling into the trap of, too much, too little or just right? Is your fundraising performing as it should, and running on the proverbial, all cylinders? Avoid being myopic, and just cutting across the board, but rather, use zero-based budgeting, so you can evaluate every non-contractual area of either income or expense!

3. Review the actual revenues and expenses from the past two years: Don’t merely guess in some areas, or resort to either wishful thinking, or speculation. Look at what has been raised in the past, and pay particular heed to what’s been spent, and see if you can get more bang-for-the-buck.

4. What works and what needs addressing: This area of consideration is often a fine line, because while one must avoid panic and using the throw the baby out with the bathwater approach, similarly, you must realize that even great ideas often need a degree of tweaking, so they don’t appear to be stale, or merely the same-old-same-old. Remember how important it is to ask relevant questions, and get as much detail and explanation as possible, so you best understand what you are reviewing!

5. Make your budget a working, living document, guide and plan: A budget, and the entire process, can be perceived either as a living, working document, or merely a time consuming, relatively worthless one. The choice is yours! Prepare a quality budget, follow it, and use it to address goals and priorities, through the year.

Budgeting may not be the most interesting process or exercise, but it is an important and relevant one. It’s a matter of how seriously you take it, and how deeply you look at what’s going on around you!

How Crowdfunding Can Help Pay Medical Bills

Crowdfunding can help pay for medical bills… it really is that simple. You can crowdfund for just about anything, including medical bills. Many times people are placed in a medical crisis and aren’t sure where to turn. Medical bills can accumulate in no time and medical bankruptcy is a real thing. You’d be amazed by how many people in “your own crowd” are willing to help.

In a study published in January 2014 from the Center For Disease Control (CDC), one in four families experienced financial burdens of medical care.

This “financial burden” of medical care equates to medical bills that they can’t currently pay and are forced to pay monthly over time.

This study goes on to share that families with lower incomes were more likely to experience the financial burdens of medical care. Those families with incomes at or below 250% of the federal poverty level had the highest levels of any financial burden of medical care.

250% of the federal poverty level (based on guidelines for 2013) means that a family of four with an annual income of $58,875 or lower were at the highest level of the population feeling the financial burden of medical care for a loved one. That’s our middle class America. Those are the families living paycheck to paycheck and not prepared for a medical crisis.

The is a baby with his eyes closed and an oxygen canula in his nose. He was born with a bad heart, a weak immune system, and problems eating which caused a condition labeled by doctors as “failure to thrive”. Isaac spent the first year of his life in and out of hospitals in Las Vegas and at Stanford where he underwent multiple heart catheterizations and procedures, open heart surgeries, and had a feeding tube placed surgically to ensure he received the proper amount of nutrients. Isaac’s family had great insurance, covering 80% of all medical costs. But, they still spent over $100,000 out-of-pocket the first year of his life in deductibles and medical related expenses.

Shocking… right?

I know… My name is Kathy, and I’m Isaac’s mom.

I remember people asking us if they could have fundraisers for us, give us money… they would offer to do anything just to help. At that time, I could not have imagined the costs that we would incur, nor could I imagine all the things that insurance doesn’t cover. You assume that you pay for insurance, you’ll have a deductible… The End.

If that were only so.

Words of Advice:

Start a Crowdfunding Campaign Immediately

Don’t be too humble to let other people offer to help you. You really can’t imagine the costs of things in the medical world and how they add up. It is TOO hard to think about money when you’re talking about the healthcare of someone you love. You want anything and everything done… you’ll worry about the bills later.

From a Mom that’s Been There

Don’t expect the people in the middle of a medical crisis to be thinking clearly (well, I sure wasn’t). If you’re related to the family or just a loving friend… talk to them about the medical bills and the reality of the situation. Talk with them about what they need now and what their needs may be in the future and help them come up with a budget and plan to get everything their loved one needs. From bills, equipment, therapy sessions… even therapy dogs, all these things can be a necessity now or in the future.

How exactly will crowdfunding help pay my medical bills?

Well, they can’t send a check to the hospital for you, but they can offer you a platform that will help you tell your story as well as share it with your friends and family. The right crowdfunding platform will provide support for you all along the way, from guidance writing your story, picking pictures to post, sharing on the social media channels, and even help writing press releases to get national exposure.

Crowdfunding can help you pay for your medical bills by allowing YOU to take care of your family and letting your “crowd” help YOU. Donations will be made by people you have inspired and want to help you. These people will have a platform to donate to you on their schedule and an amount that is within their means. They will be assured that the funds are going directly to YOU and not an anonymous organization.

SMART Tips for Saving on Your Auto Loan

Americans love cars. It is one of the reasons why America is amongst the world’s top car-owning countries. Every year, Americans spend several thousand dollars on auto loan payments. If you are looking forward to buying a car, make sure that you follow S.M.A.R.T. tips. The tips will help you save money and ensure that you do not opt for exorbitant auto loans.

Follow the S.M.A.R.T. Tips and Save Money

When car buyers have to make a decision about auto loans, logic takes a backseat and emotions become a controlling factor. It is the reason why car buyers say yes to financially harmful auto loans. To save yourself from the possibility of a financial damage, you must follow the tips.

S – Specific

The car is a huge asset. So, it is essential that you understand your requirements before buying a car. It is important that you have a specific image of the type of the car that you want. It will help you stay away from an impulse purchase. Consider the list of following factors because it will help you in choosing your perfect car:

1. Total number of passengers

2. Gearbox – Automatic or manual gearbox?

3. Cargo capacity

4. Vehicle performance

5. Driving conditions

6. Gas mileage

7. Safety features

8. Technological features

9. Parking space

M – Money

Remember that even if you opt for an auto loan, you will need to make a down payment of at least 10 percent of the total price of the car. Down payment is beneficial because it helps in reducing the loan amount. If you do not have money for down payment, do not worry. You can trade-in your old car and ask the dealer to deduct its value from the price of the new car.

A – Affordable

Selecting a specific car will be of no use to you if you cannot afford to buy it. Remember that car expenses are not limited to down payment. You will have to pay money for monthly loan payments, fuel charges as well as maintenance expenses. A general rule is to allocate no more than 20 percent of your total monthly income for car-related expenses. Keep this rule in mind and choose an auto loan that does not exceed your budget.

R – Reliable

There was a time when car buyers applied for an auto loan with the local bank only. Today, there are several ways of obtaining an auto loan. You can apply with a bank, a credit union, or an online auto financing company.

No matter what option you choose, you must ensure that the lender is a reliable one. If you opt for an online auto financing company, check the website’s security certificate. If the website doesn’t have one, stay away from it and save yourself from a potential identity theft.

T – Time

Car buyers are afraid of rate shopping because they believe that multiple credit inquiries will damage their credit score. But, do not refrain from rate shopping instead, finish it within 30 days. Why?

A time-bound search for an auto loan will ensure that you do not harm your credit score. FICO does not consider inquiries made in the 30 days prior to scoring. So, if you are able to get a loan within 30 days, it won’t affect your score. This span of time can change to 14 days if the lender uses older versions of FICO and can increase to 45 days if the lender uses the newest formula.

Car buying is one of the most expensive purchases that Americans make. If you do not pay attention to your auto loan, you can make the worst financial mistake of your life. So, avoid making a bad decision and follow the S.M.A.R.T. tips.

Rapid Car Loans is the preferred choice of car buyers for pre approved car loans. Get in touch with the company and obtain guaranteed bad credit auto loan. Apply now to buy a car today.